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Chemistry of Chocolate and Roses

February 11, 2010 10:55 by GregRublev

This is the most popular newsletter in our history.  I suppose it makes sense: who doesn't like chocolate or roses?  Hope valentine's day goes off without a hitch for everyone!

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February 2010 Newsletter 

Greetings!

February is here and with it Valentine's Day.  Bad food, long waits and poor service.  But if you get past all of the force feed love there is a lot of chemistry.  The video touches on some interesting chemistry with chocolate and roses. Enjoy.

Chocloate and Roses
CHICAGO --- A researcher from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine has invented a novel way to halt and even reverse rheumatoid arthritis. He developed an imitation of a suicide molecule that floats undetected into overactive immune cells responsible for the disease.

Whimsically referred to as Casper the Ghost, the stealthy molecule causes the immune cells to self-destruct. Read More 

A new therapeutic made from tobacco plants has been shown to arrest West Nile virus infection, according to a new study by Arizona State University scientist Qiang Chen and his colleagues.

Chen, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and professor in the College of Technology and Innovation, on the Polytechnic campus, is the first to demonstrate a plant-derived treatment to successfully combat West Nile virus after exposure and infection. The research appears in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (advanced online edition). Read More 

 

I know there are projects that need custom synthesis, medicinal chemistry or chemical consulting.  Why wait any longer submit an inquiry or use our Ask-A-Chemist service! 

Sincerely, 
Bryan Roland, Director - Project Management 
Bryan.Roland@asischem.com

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